6 years ago #1
atomant 496
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In drawing designs, how do you use the plastic 'french curves' to 'draw any curve,' as the catalog descriptions suggest? I just don't get it. I guess you look for the curve that's closest to the one you want. Then what? (Assuming that it's close but not quite what you want?)

Similarly, I recall having trouble making the 'flexible curves' take the shape I really wanted. Is there a secret to this?

Thanks for any suggestions.

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6 years ago #2
Merrill571
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Normally, one would have a sequence of 'plotted' points - then the curve is laid on until it touches FOUR of the points, and a line is drawn between the middle TWO. Repeat for each line segment. By doing it this way, you're much more likely to have successive line segments 'flow'

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6 years ago #3
Elcubasigsda
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You kind of have to see the True Curve in your head, then as John Kopf says, you use little segments of the closest curve to make up the whole. And nobody likes those damned flexible curves, at least not the cheap things they fool freshmen into buying. The french curves are really sophisticated, and you'll recognize parabolic arches, hyperboloids, catenary curves perhaps. But as an artist, you should certainly be able to draw a pretty **** nice complex curve already. The plastic tools are good for selecting one skinny line from the little bundle of sketchy marks we make.

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6 years ago #4
Rayven
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Thanks, John and Dan. That gives me a way to go at it. I can imagine both scenarios: having points I want to connect, and having a nice sketchy wide line that needs to be refined into a thin line.

selecting one skinny

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6 years ago #5
bluegreen
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Andrew lets say this in another way, lets throw away these obsolete devices such as a forge , anvils, hammers, hardy or a old Smith with all the History and skill to rebuild the world,. and buy every thing made buy a computer operated robot. We really don't need the old Obsolete devices when the power goes out,now do we?. or out were there is no power at all, with no power how long will your lap-top or note book last? My forge will last a lot longer and so will my French Curve and My brain will not crash. I can tell you are no Smith, because you will be the one looking for a Walmart in the Gobi desert and asking for a new program. with people like you history will repeat its self and Ill be here to rebuild with the skills that smithing has given me and you can take that to your E-Bank.

Hammer on.

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6 years ago #6
newpiknicker
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Bear/Gypsy, I posted my question to alt.sculpture as well as alt.crafts.blacksmithing. Sorry if this caused confusion.

I'm interested in learning to use computer drawing programs - even bought DesignCAD97 soon after buying my computer three years ago. I spent a few hours learning to use DesignCAD, then stopped. Hadn't gotten very far. In the long run, I like the idea of being able to use both a pencil and a computer for drawing - but I think it will take more time to learn computer drawing than I can invest, in the next few weeks anyway. I do want to do it eventually.

anvils, hammers, hardy power goes out,now do long will your lap-top looking for a Walmart will repeat its self that to your E-Bank.

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6 years ago #7
pranzo
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Cathy my post was not meant towards you, I have no problem with computer drawing or in sculpture work. the problem I had was the statement that was made by Andrew Werby about 'throwing away these obsolete devices' and the way he stated that ' we know you've got one' computer that is. Ive worked hard learning my art and to have someone come in and say to someone, as interested in smithing as you seem to be .( throw-away the obsolete devices is like saying 'why do we need smiths any ways' Its so obsolete why even waist your and my time with your questions. that was so condescending and rude and a insult to every smith on the list. That's why I posted and Im sorry if you took it as a assault on you. Hammer on.

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6 years ago #8
nfdouglas
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Judging from Andrew's previous posts in alt. sculpture, I have a strong suspicion that was a bit tongue-in-cheek.

Personally, though I'm not in the class that most posters are in alt.sculpture and I'm no smith, I think it worthwhile to understand as many of the old tools and the new as I can manage to comprehend and find useful. Often times, until you learn them well, you have no idea how useful they can really be. That curiosity to learn and try new tools and old in order to manipulate materials is part of what drives us toward both art and craft.

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6 years ago #9
Elassassin
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True! I made a pair of tongs for handling large round stock and pipe. The jaws are two pieces of angle TIG welded to two curved pieces of plate cut out with a plasma cutter. These are TIG'd to the reins wich are two pieces of 1/2' re-bar. I didn't have an appropriate rivet so this was forged (hamer and anvil) from a piece of scrap.

I love mixing old and new technology and, yes, I have forged a set of tongs from a single piece of flt stock completely by hand.

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6 years ago #10
Cinnerley
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It's still faster to just sketch what I want and include the needed dimensions. I can sketch a 'J' hook and needed dimensions in under a minute (even including time to find a pencil and open my sketch book). It took far longer in AutoCAD, and to be honest, I don't need that level of precision most of the time.

Dan Crowther Oak and Acorn Ancient Metalcrafts

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6 years ago #11
1blue
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Daniel, How do you replace / repair or duplicate the part in the future?

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