7 years ago#1
Linda2
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Advice please Made a sculpture/ model out of old cardboard beer boxes, and now want to render it with resin (polyurethane?) and plaster. I know an artist who has worked like this (J.Livsey) but don't have contact. Has anyone here done something like this or used resin to stiffen cardboard? I want a nice planar finish and some areas will need filling and working. I think I'll just go ahead and try but I can't afford to waste time and money. Thanks.

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7 years ago#2
prasadrvr
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[This sounds like a long-shot to me. Fine if you're interested in experimentation, but questionable if you really can't afford to waste time and money. Cardboard boxes aren't the most planar of surfaces to start with, and the addition of resin isn't going to help with that. Plus, the adhesion of plaster to a resin/cardboard substrate is far from certain. Why don't you start with plywood, and have a stiff, structural, planar surface to begin with, if that's what you want? For filling, use something like Fixall, and maybe some drywall joint compound for finishing. ]

Andrew Werby

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7 years ago#3
124C41
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Yes, no problemo. Forget the plaster, use polyester resin and glass mat. Cut the mat in pieces which fit each side [plane] you want to stiffen/immortalize. Keep them in order! Paint the catalyzed resin on each box side, then dip or paint each f'glass piece and place it, and use a brush to smooth it down and smoosh some fibers off each edge and around the corners. This will go fast. You'll be able to read the box too. Or later, cover all with gelcoat for a durable colored

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7 years ago#4
Cinnerley
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Thanks for responses Andrew, you're doubtless right but it did start kind of experimental. The piece was constructed by folding geometric nets and as an extension from folding card on a small scale I went to folding cardboard on a larger scale. I'll check out this dry wall joint compound though, since the results could be neater. Dan, love your site, most of my work has an architectural flavour and I relish ornament (!) I want to do a keystone piece at some point. Thanks for the advice, polyester resin will be much more economic than polyurethane so I may follow that up, sounds like a lot of finishing if I get sloppy though.

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7 years ago#5
Linda2
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How about this solution.. Paint the box with a solution of silver nitrate- heavy enough to carry a current. Stick it in a plating tank and electroplate it with the metal of your choice. This is permanent like old bronzed babyshoes.

Christopher

Before you buy.

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7 years ago#6
Rayven
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Electroplate it, excellent! Definitely something to try at some point but this things' a bit big! Thanks

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7 years ago#7
Woody-
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(Repost) Thanks for responses Andrew, you're doubtless right but it did start kind of experimental. The piece was constructed by folding geometric nets and as an extension from folding card on a small scale I went to folding cardboard on a larger scale. I'll check out this dry wall joint compound though, since the results could be neater. Dan, love your site, most of my work has an architectural flavour and I relish ornament (!) I want to do a keystone piece at some point. Thanks for the advice, polyester resin will be much more economic than polyurethane so I may follow that up, sounds like a lot of finishing if I get sloppy though.

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7 years ago#8
elas
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There's an British sculptor, Fergette(?), who sculpts by doing 'foldings' of large pieces canvass. He stiffens the canvass using gesso (rabitt glue and whitting). He can manipulate even the stiff folds by heating the canvass.

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7 years ago#9
David Zachmeyer
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I miswrote, he actually uses big pieces of paper. -JDK

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7 years ago#10
bgall
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Thanks K it sounds obviously a very personalized technique and all the more interesting for that, I'd like to know who the artist is, maybe you'll remember at some point. With this particular problem I think I have to consider more carefully what I'm trying to do, ( not too carefully though or nothing ever gets made, I should know.)

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