4 years ago#1
Guest
Guest

can i put anything in with latex so i can make a thicker coat when applying it,

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4 years ago#2
jade
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No petroleum based materials. There is a latex thickener you can use. The thicker the coat is, the more brittle it is.

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4 years ago#3
Iconmaker
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what about shredded tire shavings. Works great and cts as reinforcment

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4 years ago#4
jade
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As far as I know tires are petroleum based.

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4 years ago#5
red46
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If you're talking about getting the mold done faster, use burlap strips after the first 3 layers. I first apply latex, then push small strips into the wet layer and add a little more so the burlap is entirely encased in latex.

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4 years ago#6
GunZ McGraw
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Urefil 9 Filler can be mixed with latex
You can buy latex with a thicking agent added too. I use 100 % cotton balls to fill undercuts.

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4 years ago#7
GunZ McGraw
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I've over stayed. bye!

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3 years ago#8
japjapjap1
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hi,if i brush on latex 3 or 4 coats,if u got a box of latex gloves cut them up and add them to the wet latex, and keep repeating this, building up the layers, do u think this would work,thanks

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3 years ago#9
GunZ McGraw
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You never know until u try something? but I would use clean dry fine hardwood saw dust before cut up latex gloves?

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3 years ago#10
Nevile Stocken
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Mixing latex with tire shavings is not a problem. Tire shavings are universally used throughout the garden ornament and statuary industry to reinforce latex molds, which are then used for virtually all cement castings sold. It works perfectly.

The piece must be initially covered with at least 3 to 5 layers of pure latex to get the impression, which will take 3 to 5 days, painting 1 layer per day.

On the following day, mix the tire shavings with the latex sufficient make a thick paste, then lather on the latex mold.

Repeat this procedure for as many days as it takes to achieve the desired thickness for your mold, and finish with a final coat of pure latex.

Then make your mother mold from hydrocal and polyfiber.

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3 years ago#11
mickpearson
Guest

Hi. cured latex will not mix with wet latex its much older than your fresh latex so it wont fit your gloves for a small project like yours latex thickner is all you need

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3 years ago#12
metled stone
Guest

I've been using latex and other products for making concrete garden sculpture molds, but still haven't found the ideal material (or way to use it perhaps); the tire shavings as thickener sounds very interesting.

Can I ask how much is lost in flexibility by adding tire shavings, these sculptures have some undercuts (like animal heads with chins, ears, etc.). It would be nice to do as "a glove" that can be peeled off in one piece, but my latest attempt was too thin and ended up floppy.

Thanks! I just found this site and it looks super

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3 years ago#13
mickpearson
Guest

HI. ALL you need is latex thickener.put your first coat of latex on without thickener on let it dry slightly before you ad the next coats of latex on you will need to paint several coats of latex on before it is thick enough to use you can test if it is thick enough by lifting the bottom of your latex mould out a little don.t take it of until you are happy. sack the tyre shavings idea. you don.t need it you only need patients / it takes a week to make a mould in latex that is why most people use silicon though i have not used dragonskin from smoothon it makes moulds like latex. glove moulds. you can thicken it but.have a mould ready in an hour the problem you are having is taking your mould of far to soon be patient. so remember first one or two coats without thickener and then ad some thickener to your second container of latex don.t ad to much you just want it to look like emulsion paint.

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3 years ago#14
metled stone
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Thanks very much Mick; I've used a couple smooth-on products but not the dragon skin, but it has tempted me. Do you know which method for casting concrete might be the most economical? I think probably latex, but, as you say, you need to be patient. The other smooth-on products I had some trouble with, and are pricey, but I know they have a lot of different ones...

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3 years ago#15
mickpearson
Guest

HELLO. how are you doing. latex is the cheapest. but the time is a killer. if you cast some of your items in plaster so that you have more than one of your model; and paint the first coat of latex on to burst the air bubbles. then secure your model made of plaster inside a big enough container. and pour your thickened latex on top of it and let it steep in the latex for a few hours. a coat thick enough to use should build up because plaster draws moisture of the latex and this helps to build up the layers. and is known as the dipping method.your moulds will be of shop quality to. but in terms of getting more resin type castings. silicons last longer if you want to use resin a lot. although i have made many resin models from latex moulds before the latex has died on me. after the latex has dried on my brushes i steep my brushes to clean them and i can then reuse them i don.t throw my brushes away.

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3 years ago#16
mickpearson
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OH YEA. as soon as i see a question i do answer as soon as possible but because i live on the other side of the world my answers have a few hours time laps so keep looking and ill get to you as soon as poss.

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3 years ago#17
Use an insert
Guest

Use a sponge or flexible foam insert cut to the approximate size and shape of the undercut for your piece. Cover it with the latex (and/or) paint over it with it, then fit it into your undercut cavity. Add just enough latex to get an impression of the area of the undercut.

After the undercut insert is thoroughly dry (allow at least three days), paint the latex over the piece layer by layer in the usual manner until the mold is complete.

The foam rubber insert should be large enough so that it nestles into the pocket of the main mold. When the piece is cast and solidified, after the removal of the main glove mold holding the impression of the majority of the piece, the latex insert can be collapsed and removed by squeezing it by hand, leaving a clean cast of the undercut without damaging the mold or the casting.

This is another technique used to cast complex pieces in the garden statuary industry.

Nevile

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3 years ago#18
mickpearson
Guest

HI smoothon have a lot of good materials but you cant buy most of them in the uk but i do have companies in the uk. that supply materials that i have not seen in the states either i think it is good to have more than one supplier and some companies are cheaper than others.the fastest way to make latex moulds is the dipping method. silicon moulds are good for making large hollow castings out of resin such as huge bronze cold casts. marble. and varios stone effects can be achieved.

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3 years ago#19
metled stone
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Thanks so much Mick and Nevile. The dipping method sounds good... obviously you'd need a lot of latex for the larger pieces but I like the idea. And I agree about checking around for lots of suppliers, there aren't too many yet that we've found in Canada.

Thanks for the undercut method... so, I guess you just put a bit of latex on that part so that it will be thin and flexible where you need it to be (so it's stretchy etc.); oh, I see, when taking it off it can be squeezed small so that it doesn't need to stretch as much. brilliant. I think I need to try it or to see it to really understand, but you've given me a good general idea... do you know if there's pics or video of that? I'll check on google or youtube.

So, apart from the tips and the expense and the time, do people generally think that latex is the best for casting concrete sculptures? Or are polyurethanes or others considered better overall (for strength, flexibility etc.). The answer is probably 'it depends'

thanks again

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3 years ago#20
mickpearson
Guest

HI. your welcome.silicon is the preferred. mould making rubber for sculptures.although expensive.it works out cheap in the fact that you calculate.and only buy what you need some people beginners.tend to buy say 10kg.for a project that may only required 3kg and spend to much.the difference being you cant make a glove mould you have to make split moulds but silicons can handle heat and chemicals some silicons are used for low melt metals to make fishing waits or small metal figurines and they are exellent for making the largest moulds and when looked after will last longer than latex but the thing i do is make some masters if i think im going to use resins in the same mould of latex a lot and i will cast them in plaster so that i have more than one mould so it does not mater if resin destroys my latex mould eventually as you can still get hundreds of casts out of it before that happens some people get less because they will use to much catalyst witch destroys the latex mould quicker but silicon is tough and can handle chemicals/ and if you search the web you might find some places in CANADA. that sells casting material as i found one while looking for cement fondue and i come frome the UK i found it for someone who lived there but they could have found it if they looked on the web.

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3 years ago#21
absolutely.
Guest

For production work, latex is always the mold material of choice. Since the garden statuary industry is extremely competitive, the emphasis is always on producing items quickly and above all cheaply. If you do plan to cast concrete, ALWAYS make your first complete cast in plaster. That way, you always have a production master handy to mold from when your latex mold eventually wears out and needs to be replaced.

Tire shavings are almost universally used in the garden ornament industry as the thickening agent of choice. They cost almost nothing to procure, and they do the job adequately. The only disadvantage of tire shavings is that one looks a bit grimy after their use, but easily remedied by soap and water. Smooth- on's stuff is good too, but pricey, so better suited for the more fastidious with money to waste.

Nevile

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3 years ago#22
mickpearson
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HI. thanks nevile. i have never tried the tyre shavings before and thought it would be a bit lumpy so ill give it a go myself.

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3 years ago#23
nevile
Guest

they are a by-product of re-capping a tire -basically vulcanized rubber ground off old tires. a little of the stuff goes a long way so use judiciously. moldmakers in the industry keep a separate batch from the pure latex used to grab the detail impressions. three to five coats of pure latex coats should suffice. then build up with the tire shaving mix, then finish with a couple of coats of pure latex to smooth out the surface for the mother mold.

good luck

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3 years ago#24
jade
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Where do I find those tire shavings. I guess it sold for commercial use but can it be found in smaller quantities too?

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3 years ago#25
red46
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Check out http://polytek.com. They might have it.

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3 years ago#26
jade
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I took a brief look. It seems interesting tho I didn't find anything there about this recycled material.
Thanks

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3 years ago#27
nevile
Guest

Douglas & Sturgiss in San Francisco should have them. It is where I bought my last batch years ago. They have a website and they do business online. They are sculpture supply specialists. you can find them at this link:
http://www.artstuf.com/

Lovely people to deal with. I did business with them on and off for the better part of three decades. They carry a complete line of stuff at great prices. If they don't have what you're looking for, you probably don't need it.

Nevile

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3 years ago#28
jade
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Thanks Nevile, I found it there. I keep thinking what else can be done with this reused material.

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9 months ago#29
Tracybat
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Reading this has just answered some of my questions, so that I can the post again I'm leaving this comment

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